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History

"We are not makers of history. We are made by history."  Martin Luther King, Jr.

Why we teach History

We are passionate about history at Colliers Green as learning history gives children the opportunity to develop an understanding of why the world and its people are the way they are today. Study of history will always prompt children to question as they explore the diversity of human experience, past lives and societies.

Learning history supports our three school values:

  • Aspiration: loving the world through empathy and understanding of those who came before us.
  • Resilience: loving yourself by learning from mistakes and successes of history
  • Community: loving each other by learning about the history of our school and locality

Accordion Title

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed History – key stages 1 and 2
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:
  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed History – key stages 1 and 2  
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

How History is taught at Colliers Green

In each academic year, children will undertake the study of at least two history topics. Our challenge based learning sets children a target to work towards, which inspires and focuses their learning. This way of teaching develops the children’s ability to be independent learners, using the key historical skills they have gained to analyse, question and compare sources of evidence to form their own judgements about the past.

Cross-curricular links

In order to extend the children’s learning teachers frequently make purposeful links with other subjects. Children undertake drama and dance as a way of learning about the past. They also use ICT to enhance their learning. In addition, each history topic is carefully planned to allow opportunities for extended writing too.

Year Group Coverage

Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4
Homes Famous people Vikings Gunpowder Plot
Nursery Rhymes The Great Fire of London Crime and Punishment Tudors
Toys Castles Ancient Egyptians Ancient Greece
  Dinosaurs School in the past World War II
  Family Tree Early Settlers Victorians
    Romans Ancient China
    Mayans